Science/Nature

The real cabbage soup diet: What Britons ate down the ages

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Ancient Britons were eating dairy, peas, cabbage and oats, according to gunk trapped in their teeth.Scientists analysed dental plaque found on the teeth of skeletons from the Iron Age to post-Medieval times.They found evidence of milk proteins, cereals and plants, as well as an enzyme that aids digestion.In modern samples, they found proteins that reflect a more cosmopolitan diet, including potatoes, soya and peanuts.The research
Science/Nature

Are young people going cool on cars?

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionViews on car ownershipCould you live without a car? Reya El-Salahi from London asked herself this question when she moved into a car-free development, but over the past year she's been fine.Lil Boyer from Dorset says she can't use rural buses because they are "rubbish" - but she's embarrassed to drive so much.They are part of a trend of young people
Science/Nature

The new sharks coming to UK as temperatures rise

[ad_1] Research from the University of Southampton suggests new kinds of shark could migrate to UK waters as the oceans warm.Dr Ken Collins, from the university's National Oceanography Centre, says 10 species of shark currently found in warmer parts of the world could inhabit our seas by 2050 because of climate change.Here, we profile some of the species that could become a familiar fixture in coming decades.Great hammerhead Image copyright
Science/Nature

UK to build record-breaking solar planes

[ad_1] Image copyright Airbus A solar plane which can stay aloft for weeks at a time is to be manufactured by Airbus in the UK.The unmanned craft flies high in the atmosphere to avoid commercial air traffic and adverse weather.Known as the Zephyr, its remote-sensing potential has already seen the UK MoD invest, but Airbus also hope to develop the craft as a communications platform.The Zephyr will now begin industrial
Science/Nature

Lift-off for Scotland: Sutherland to host first UK spaceport

[ad_1] Image copyright Perfect Circle Image caption Artwork: This is what a Scottish spaceport could look like in the early 2020s A remote, boggy stretch of land on the north coast of Scotland is set to become the UK's first spaceport.The A'Mhoine Peninsula in Sutherland has been chosen as the most suitable place from which to launch rockets vertically to put satellites in orbit.The UK Space Agency is giving Highlands
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Arundel road scheme ‘could harm ancient woodland’

[ad_1] Image caption Campaigners say a few minutes shaved off journey times don't justify the potential damage to the park Road builders planning a bypass in Sussex, UK, have been urged to find a way that doesn't cause damage to ancient woodland.The head of South Downs National Park, Margaret Paren, believes engineers can devise a scheme to take cars out of the park, not through it.She says the plan could
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Nation’s botanical treasures to go on display

[ad_1] Image copyright RHS Image caption A Chilean potato plant brought back by Charles Darwin in 1835 A potato plant collected by Charles Darwin during his voyage on the Beagle is among botanical treasures to go on display to the public for the first time.The specimen was re-discovered in a cabinet in the herbarium of the Royal Horticultural Society five years ago.The famous naturalist came across the plant on an
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Iceman’s last meal was high-fat, high-calorie feast

[ad_1] Image copyright SouthtyrolarchaeologymuseumEuracM.Samadelli Image caption The man's stomach is examined Goat's fat and wild venison, plus sides of ancient wheat and bracken.It's not a menu likely to appear on Masterchef, but for some of our ancestors it was a nutritious feast.Scientists have revealed that the last supper of Oetzi the Iceman was well-balanced but also alarmingly high in fat.The man lived 5,300 years ago and met his death on
Science/Nature

‘We can build a real time machine’

[ad_1] Image copyright BBC / Thomas Scheidl Image caption Ron Mallett built a device that illustrates principles he believes could be used to build a time machine Travelling in time might sound like a flight of fancy, but some physicists think it might really be possible. BBC Horizon looked at some of the most promising ideas for turning this staple of science fiction into reality.Ron Mallett has a dream: He
Science/Nature

Polluters exposed by new eye in the sky satellite

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Norilsk in the Arctic Circle is built on its mining and smelting industries What must it be like to live in the Siberian town of Norilsk on a "bad air day"? They say the local smelting industry produces 1% of all the sulphur dioxide (SO₂) going into the air globally, something close to two million tonnes a year. SO₂ is particularly unpleasant if
Science/Nature

Discovering King Tutankhamun’s tomb: Harry Burton’s photographs

[ad_1] Image copyright Griffith Institute/Oxford University Image caption The inlaid beard normally seen on the mask was attached in the 1940s A new exhibition reappraises the work of Harry Burton, who photographed the decade-long Tutankhamun excavation. The collection is a striking record of a groundbreaking moment in our study of the past.It was one of the most remarkable archaeological discoveries of the 20th Century.But what was it like to first
Science/Nature

Exomoons: On the hunt for distant worlds

[ad_1] Image copyright Grace Elizabeth Harrison Image caption Artist's impression: An exomoon orbits a distant planet The search for exoplanets, which orbit distant stars, has opened up a whole galaxy of worlds beyond our own. Over 3,700 have been discovered to date, but they may have companions.Since the first confirmed discovery of planets beyond our own Solar System over 20 years ago, we have known that our stellar neighbourhood is
Science/Nature

Saving koalas: Gene study promises solution to deadly sex disease

[ad_1] Image copyright GREG WOOD Despite being (possibly) the world's cuddliest creature, the super-sweet koala is also one of the unluckiest animals on the planet.Australia's most famous tree hugger has been ravaged by sexually transmitted disease, attacks from dogs, being hit by cars and habitat loss.Chlamydia has spread fast in koalas, causing infertility and blindness.But scientists say decoding the genome should lead to an effective vaccine for the STD. In
Science/Nature

‘The ocean is my home – and it’s being trashed’

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionProf Steve Simpson: Yachts run silent, making them perfect for sound research"If you opened your curtains in the morning and found that the grass was scorched, somebody had dumped a load of rubbish in your garden and animals were eating it - you'd be appalled. But that's what's happening in the oceans," says Sarah La Grue. "The reefs are being scorched,
Science/Nature

Reality Check: Are butterflies getting rarer?

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images It's been claimed that butterfly populations in the UK are falling rapidly. Do the figures back this up?Their names are as varied and colourful as their wings.The Duke of Burgundy, the Lulworth skipper, the chalk hill blue, the painted lady and the small pearl-bordered fritillary are among the 59 species of butterfly regularly found in the UK.But, adored as they are, it's often claimed that
Science/Nature

What makes people deeply dippy for dinosaurs?

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionChildren meet Dippy at Birmingham Museum & Art GalleryThe Natural History Museum's most famous resident is on tour - and the crowds gathering to see Dippy suggest a dinosaur love affair that's far from extinct. But what explains this gut-level fascination for doomed reptiles from which we are separated by millions of years?"Come and say hello to Dippy," says the man
Science/Nature

How trying to stay cool could make the world even hotter

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption What's the best way to keep cool in a warming world? Air conditioning systems that keep homes, offices and shops cool on hot days are rapidly gaining in popularity in a warming world. But is all the extra electricity they use going to exacerbate climate change or can design efficiencies prevent this?The world is getting hotter, indeed 16 of the 17 warmest years
Science/Nature

Bloodhound Diary: Braking with confidence

[ad_1] Image copyright Flock and Siemens A British team is developing a car that will be capable of reaching 1,000mph (1,610km/h). Powered by a rocket bolted to a Eurofighter-Typhoon jet engine, the vehicle aims to show its potential by going progressively faster, year after year. In mid-2019, Bloodhound wants to run above 500mph. In late 2019, the goal is to raise the existing world land speed record (763mph; 1,228km/h) to
Science/Nature

Does the US have a pet tiger problem?

[ad_1] Image copyright Ruaridh C/Barcroft Media via Getty Images Image caption Janice Haley at home in Orlando with Janda in 2014 There may be more captive tigers in the US than wild ones in the rest of the world. But in states like Texas that bristle at government interference, no-one really knows how many are being kept as pets. Taj was a four-month-old tiger cub when purchased at a Texas