Science/Nature

Northern white rhino: New hopes for IVF rescue

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Sudan was the last of his kind A new study raises hopes of saving one of the last animals of its kind.A victim of poaching, the northern white rhino population has been reduced to just two females, which are both unable to breed. DNA evidence shows the rhino is more closely related than previously thought to its southern white cousin.Creating rhino hybrids using
Science/Nature

Metop weather satellite prepares for lift-off

[ad_1] Image copyright ESA Image caption The Metop satellites circle the globe probing the state of the atmosphere Europe is about to put a front-line weather satellite in orbit that has components which are over a decade old. The Metop-C spacecraft is due to launch from French Guiana late on Tuesday local time, and will circle the globe, gathering data that will feed into daily forecasts. The satellite was procured
Science/Nature

Helpline to tackle bullying in chemistry

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images/Universal Images Group Bullying and harassment is such a problem in the world of chemistry that a dedicated helpline is being set up for victims, a scientific body says.The Royal Society of Chemistry says people were being denied opportunities because of "a culture of secrecy" and the 'unchecked power of managers'.The research showed both men and women have been bullied and harassed by colleagues.But it was
Science/Nature

Ron Howard: Creating vision of a future Mars colony

[ad_1] Image copyright NAtional Geographic Image caption The series Mars envisages how a pioneer human settlement might function on the Red Planet To mark the second season of the television series Mars, Hollywood director Ron Howard talked to the BBC about creating a realistic depiction of the first human colonies on the Red Planet.If humankind is to expand out into the Universe, then Mars is likely to be our first
Science/Nature

Large hydropower dams ‘not sustainable’ in the developing world

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Problems at the Oroville dam in California in 2017 saw 10,000 people evacuated A new study says that many large scale hydropower projects in Europe and the US have been disastrous for the environment.Dozens of these dams are being removed every year, with many considered dangerous and uneconomic.But the authors fear that the unsustainable nature of these projects has not been recognised in
Science/Nature

Dinosaur world ‘more colourful than we thought’

[ad_1] Image copyright Yale University Image caption Spot the dinosaur egg Why do some birds lay colourful eggs? From pale blue to speckled red, they come in every shade and hue.The answer, say scientists, is that coloured eggs evolved millions of years ago in birds' ancestors, the dinosaurs.The patterns and colours may have served to camouflage eggs from predators as white eggs stand out more against darker backgrounds. Thus, the
Science/Nature

Revealed: The secret of the poet’s daffodil

[ad_1] Image copyright Rodney Lay/RHS Image caption Narcissus poeticus (Pheasant’s eye daffodil) The secrets of a flower known as the poet's daffodil have fallen to science.The genetic code of the daffodil's chloroplast - the DNA responsible for photosynthesis - has been mapped for the first time.Narcissus poeticus was one of the first daffodils to be cultivated, and is linked to the Greek legend of Narcissus. In Greek mythology, the flower
Science/Nature

Scottish researchers create ‘crystal maze’ for light

[ad_1] Image copyright Channel 4 Image caption The TV programme Crystal Maze is rather different to the research experiment Researchers at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh have created a "crystal maze" to control how light spreads. However, unlike the Channel 4 TV game show, this one is telling scientists more about how light can be manipulated. It could also lead to new and better devices in fields like healthcare and telecommunications.
Science/Nature

Fireworks: How do they work and how are they made?

[ad_1] Occasions like Bonfire Night, New Years Eve, Diwali and the Fourth of July weekend are marked by fireworks displays every year.But the flare and skill of fireworks today wouldn't exist, without some simple, but clever, chemistry.So how do fireworks work exactly? How are they made – and how do they get their different colours? Dr Joanna Buckley invited the BBC to the chemistry laboratories at the University of Sheffield
Science/Nature

InSight: The jeopardy of landing on Mars

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionNasa's Insight video is fronted by chief engineer Rob ManningThe American space agency has released a video describing the perilous journey its InSight probe will make to the surface of Mars later this month.Fronted by Rob Manning, the chief engineer at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the film describes the various stages of what is termed "entry, descent and landing", or EDL.It
Science/Nature

Five products you didn’t know were harming the environment

[ad_1] Image copyright PA Image caption Research suggests sunscreen could contribute to coral bleaching Palau has become the first country to impose a widespread ban on sunscreen in order to protect its vulnerable coral reefs - but for many consumers this may be the first they have heard of the product's harmful effects.Researchers believe 10 chemical ingredients found in sunscreen are highly toxic to marine life, and can make coral
Science/Nature

Orion capsule: Europe delivers astronaut spaceship’s first ‘powerhouse’

[ad_1] Image copyright AIRBUS Image caption The European Service Module pushes the Orion capsule through space European industry has handed over a key part of the spaceship infrastructure that will take humans beyond Earth and into the wider Solar System. At a ceremony at Bremen airport in Germany, American officials accepted the first service module that will power an Orion capsule. Orion is the next-generation vehicle that the US is
Science/Nature

Why social media is obsessed with this ‘rock star’ duck

[ad_1] Image copyright Phil Torres Celebrity spotters in New York City, have a new star in their sights: A multi-coloured duck. The male mandarin duck - Aix galericulata - has found fame in the Big Apple after he appeared in Central Park. His colourful plumage quickly earned him a keen following on social media. It all started on 10 October, when a video of the colourful bird was shared on
Science/Nature

Fish fingers surprisingly sustainable, say conservationists

[ad_1] Image copyright PA Fish fingers are surprisingly sustainable and some of the best products to buy are also the cheapest, the Marine Conservation Society says.Some 85% of the fish in 48 supermarket own-brand and branded fingers came from sustainable sources, its study found. The MCS's Rajina Gurung said it was an "unexpected" result, adding it was hard for shoppers to know the source of the fish at a glance
Science/Nature

Norfolk cattle farmer warns of mass balloon release hazard

[ad_1] Image copyright Cait Clarke Image caption Cait Clarke was checking 12 of the animals she keeps in a field in nearby Ludham when she found 10 balloons, with one in a calf's mouth A cattle farmer has warned people against releasing balloons after one of her calves tried to eat one.Cait Clarke, of Runham, near Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, farms about 50 Aberdeen Angus cattle.She was checking 12 of the
Science/Nature

Rise in UK weather extremes over the last decade – Met Office

[ad_1] Image copyright PAUL ELLIS Image caption While 2018 saw an extremely hot summer in the UK, the previous decade was also warmer than the long-term average A new Met Office report says the UK has experienced more weather extremes over the last 10 years when compared to previous decades.The hottest days have become hotter, warm spells have increased, while the coldest days are not as cold. The number of
Science/Nature

Campaign set up to oppose spaceport in Sutherland

[ad_1] Image copyright Orbex Image caption Concept art of a Sutherland satellite launch site A pressure group has been set up to oppose plans to construct a spaceport in Sutherland.Land on the Melness Crofting Estate has been identified as the potential location for the launching of rockets carrying micro satellites.The UK Space Agency and Highlands and Islands Enterprise are among organisations supporting the project.But some crofters have concerns about its
Science/Nature

Project to decode ‘all complex life’ on Earth

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images A mission to sequence the genome of every known animal, plant, fungus and single-celled organism known collectively as protozoa has been launched by an international team. The Earth BioGenome Project (EBP) has been described as a "moonshot for biology".A key aim is to use the information in efforts to conserve threatened species. Scientists say clues about how species adapt to environmental change could be hidden